NBA

Vinsanity grinds into a 21st season, rare company in the NBA

By PAUL NEWBERRY

AP Sports Writer

ATLANTA (AP) Vince Carter feels like a 20-something again.

Always does when this time of year rolls around.

Never mind the specks of gray in his beard, all the wear and tear on his body, a resume that shows he entered the NBA the same year teammate Trae Young was born.

Carter has made it to another opening night. The thrill of a new season flows through those creaky ol' bones. Once again, it all seems worthwhile: the monotonous practices, the tedious film sessions, the long plane flights, the grind of 82 games.

"If I had that old `heck, here we go again' feeling, then I wouldn't play," Carter said Tuesday, having finished up practice with a few extra jumpers. "This is like I'm in my third, fourth, fifth year. I'm excited about the opportunity. I'm excited about playing. I still love playing. I still love competing. I still enjoy the traveling, the ups and downs of the league. That's what it's all about. It's hard to let go."

The league's oldest player - Carter is 41 and will turn another year older in January - is back for his 21st season. That puts him on the cusp of some very exclusive company: Robert Parrish, Kevin Willis and Kevin Garnett are the only players to last that long in the NBA (Dallas' Dirk Nowitzki also has a chance to join the 21 Club this year).

Carter is hardly chasing a championship, signing on with a rebuilding Atlanta Hawks team that is years away from having a realistic shot at competing for a title. He's here to mentor to a bunch of young players and serve as a virtual player-coach on a first-year staff led by Lloyd Pierce.

"When we have our locker room and on-the-bus debates and conversations, he's on our side," quipped Pierce, a rookie head coach who is only about eight months older than Carter. "He can relate a little closer to the coaching staff than he can with the players."

Kent Bazemore, the last holdover from a 60-win team that reached the Eastern Conference finals in 2015, lost most of his golfing buddies - including Paul Millsap and Kyle Korver - when the Hawks embarked on a rebuilding plan that send them tumbling to 24-58 last season.

With Carter on the roster, Bazemore again has someone to tee it up with on off days.

"I've got a new golfing buddy," said Bazemore, who at 29 is one of the oldest players on the roster not named Vince Carter. "I'm excited about that. (The younger players) haven't gotten into it yet."

As expected, Carter takes some good-natured ribbing from his teammates, a grandpa joke here, an "ain't it past your bedtime" there.

But all in all, he seems to fit it quite nicely with all these kids.

"We have a lot in common, believe it or not," Carter said, breaking into a smile. "I make it my business to know what's going on in the millennial world."

While expected to fill a largely backup role for the Hawks, Carter will be in the starting lineup when they open the season Wednesday night against the New York Knicks. He's subbing for power forward John Collins, a first-round pick in 2017 and one of those building blocks for Atlanta's future, who is sidelined by an ankle injury.

Never mind that Carter is only 6-foot-6 and has spent his entire career at shooting guard and small forward.

Wherever he's needed, he's ready to give it a shot.

"I prepare myself in the summer for any situation," Carter said. "I tell the coach first thing: `I'm willing to do whatever it takes.'"

Young, the No. 5 overall pick and cornerstone of the Hawks' makeover, looks forward to gleaning all he can from a player who was once one of the league's brightest stars, a guy who threw down sick jams and averaged more than 20 points a game in 10 of his first 12 seasons.

Carter's above-the-rim antics earned him a variety of nicknames - from "Vinsanity" to "Half-Man, Half-Amazing" - and a likely spot one day in the Basketball Hall of Fame, even though he's never won a championship and there was griping early in his career about whether he was giving it his all.

These days, he's a respected senior citizen, a player who draws nothing but awe for hanging on as long as he has, even though he's bounced around to six teams in the past decade and hasn't been a regular starter since 2012.

"He's experienced so many things," Young said. "I can go to him about anything and just ask him questions. He's a future Hall of Famer. I'm just blessed to be around him and get advice from him."

Carter hasn't decided how long this ride will last.

Twenty-one years might be enough.

Then again, if he still feels that same sort of excitement that he's feeling right now, he might go where no one has gone before in the NBA.

A 22nd season.

"At year 18, 19, I just said I'll assess how I feel and the situation at the end of each year," Carter said. "Just because I'm close to a bunch of different accomplishments, I don't want to change my routine. I've had a lot of success doing it this way."

With that, Carter hustled off to the locker room, the last guy to leave the court.

There was another flight to catch.

Another opening night to get to.

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Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 . His work can be found at https://apnews.com/search/paul%20newberry

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For more AP NBA coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball

Updated October 16, 2018


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